About LACK

World-class clinical services for infants, children and adults with allergic disorders.

At our Allergy Test Clinic, patients receive world-class professional care from a medical team that focuses on food allergies, eczema, hay fever and asthma. Our practice’s philosophy centres on expert professional patient care. We work actively and proactively to treat our patients, looking to the future and long-term care, alongside continually innovating our methods and research in accordance with the latest medical developments. Our ultimate objective: to diagnose and treat allergies and allergy-related complications in a friendly, patient-centric environment.

Professor Gideon Lack

The practice is founded and run by Professor Gideon Lack, a renowned allergist and pediatric allergy professor at King’s College London. Alongside London Allergy Care, Professor Lack is the current Head of the Children’s Allergy Service at St Guy’s and also St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trusts. In 2010, he was awarded the William Frankland Excellence in Allergy Award by the British Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Professor Lack is supported in the LACK clinic by a highly qualified and skilled team of nurses and consultants. The team’s expertise and experience spans across adult and child care, making London Allergy Care and Knowledge the most trusted practice in the field. Additionally, Professor Lack is the founder of two world-renowned and leading studies on allergies: LEAP and EAT.

The LEAP Study

Innovations in specialist allergy research have made groundbreaking discoveries in recent times. The team at LEAP, founded by Professor Gideon Lack, have proven - for the first time in medical research - that allergic disease is entirely preventable. Further research and studies are now in development, including works on new treatments for allergic diseases. The LEAP Study is advancing possibility into actionable allergic practice. www.leapstudy.co.uk

The EAT Study

The Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) Study investigates the potential of reducing allergic response through the early introduction of six allergenic foods into an infant’s diet: milk, peanut, sesame, fish, egg and wheat. The study has concentrated on infants from three months old who are breastfed. Results display a reduction in the number of children developing food allergies and other allergic diseases (such as eczema and asthma) by three years of age.